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  • I want MODx to be the premeire platform for deploying standards-compliant websites. That means making it "automagically" able to address common Windows IE discrepancies in how it handles things like:


    • alpha-transparency in PNG files (foreground and background images)
    • support for hovering over arbitrary elements (not just HREFs)
    • possible support for other CSS selectors (first-child, last-child, etc.)
    • fixing flashing images on hover for IE via sending specific header info to the browser
    • [/list:u]

      This might involve PHP code or javascript for the PNG support, additional javascript + behaviors, and so on.

      What do you all think?
      Ryan Thrash, MODX Co-Founder
      Follow me on Twitter at @rthrash or catch my occasional unofficial thoughts at thrash.me
    • I want MODx to be the premeire platform for deploying standards-compliant websites. That means making it "automagically" able to address common Windows IE discrepancies in how it handles things like:


      • alpha-transparency in PNG files (foreground and background images)
      • support for hovering over arbitrary elements (not just HREFs)
      • possible support for other CSS selectors (first-child, last-child, etc.)
      • fixing flashing images on hover for IE via sending specific header info to the browser
      • [/list:u]

        This might involve PHP code or javascript for the PNG support, additional javascript + behaviors, and so on.

        What do you all think?

      The PNG stuff would be awesome. I didn't realize until I tried including some PNG's with Alpha transparency recently that IE didn't handle it properly, and now that I know how to fix it... :wink:

      Actually, I'd like to see these as pluggable scripts of some kind. For the PHP stuff, no problem, but we might need a way to define/include javascripts (and possible other scripts) in the manager interface.

      The CSS stuff is cool, but I think everyone still disagrees on the methods to achieve cross-browser consistent designs. For instance, I use a lot of CSS hacks myself, to get around browser inconsistencies, as well as splitting my stylesheets into core and extended sets, using the LINK tag to refernce the core styles and the @import directive to load more advanced styles that might not be available in browsers that don't support @import CSS directives. In any case, these would be great options for those who want to address some of these things using scripts.

      Any other thoughts?
    Jason Coward
    Chief Architect @ MODX
    http://www.jasoncoward.com | http://twitter.com/drumshaman | https://github.com/opengeek
  • What I'm talking about fixing though is IE's complete lack of or partial support for certain selectors. For example, IE only supports :hover on HREFs. If it weren't for a bit of javascript and a behavior file, I'd be unable to create menus like at landplan.vertexworks.com.

    Similarly, IE doesn't properly support min/max properties properly. So no amount of hacking will fix that deficiency... it takes extra code here and there.

    Just because it'd be available, doesn't mean you'd have to use it (just turn it off in the manager). wink You could still continue to hack-away in your preferred style. I agree though, it'd be great to implement this as a manager plugin/module/whatever.
      Ryan Thrash, MODX Co-Founder
      Follow me on Twitter at @rthrash or catch my occasional unofficial thoughts at thrash.me
    • Oooh, yes, please! I can never remember this stuff and have to go searching through my links to how to do it; although I usually just try to keep my design simple enough to not need a whole lot of it.
        Studying MODX in the desert - http://sottwell.com
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      • I want MODx to be the premeire platform for deploying standards-compliant websites. That means making it "automagically" able to address common Windows IE discrepancies in how it handles things like:

        What do you all think?

        Well this is one where I think we disagree. I'd be in favor of this as some sort of optional addon/plugin/whatever. I think the CMS shouldn't be involved in managing these sorts of things, it is more good template coding. Most of the issues can be fixed by just linking in some JS libraries right? If someone really wants to code up there site with tables and font tags then they should be perfectly fine to. Which makes me think of the concept of "template variants" for things like WML, XML, printer versions, etc.
        • That's why I love this place!

          With the right amount of input we'll be able to find the right amount of balance to put all of these ideas together.

          I'd be fine with just a plugin to handle this.
            Tangent-Warrior smiley
          • I have absolutely zero problems with implementing this as an optional plugin. smiley
              Ryan Thrash, MODX Co-Founder
              Follow me on Twitter at @rthrash or catch my occasional unofficial thoughts at thrash.me