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  • Agreed Jeff. I pretty much target IE 5.5+, Safari and Firefox now, with a smattering of Opera thrown in here and there. The other browsers just don’t merit attention at this point for the amount of work required to support them (and the installed base compared tothe benefits it would bring to clients).

    Regardless when they’re deployed, they will all degrade acceptably so all the content will be accessible.
      Ryan Thrash, MODX Co-Founder
      Follow me on Twitter at @rthrash or catch my occasional unofficial thoughts at thrash.me
    • Quote from: rthrash at Jul 15, 2005, 05:11 PM

      Agreed Jeff. I pretty much target IE 5.5+, Safari and Firefox now, with a smattering of Opera thrown in here and there. The other browsers just don’t merit attention at this point for the amount of work required to support them (and the installed base compared tothe benefits it would bring to clients).

      Regardless when they’re deployed, they will all degrade acceptably so all the content will be accessible.

      In my designs, I would concur with this philosophy. 5.5+
      • Have you guys seen Dean Edwards’ "IE7 Compatibility Script"? It does a fantastic job of making IE6 behave like a vaguely standards-compliant browser - I gather that even Microsoft themselves were using it in the early stages of building IE7 - squashing a lot of the worst layout bugs and adding support for transparent pngs too (as long as one names the files according to his convention: "foo.png" should be called "foo-trans.png" as I recall).

        I include it by default in anything I do.

        Check it out at http://dean.edwards.name/IE7/

        Edit:
        You can amend Dean’s code so that it’ll give alpha transparency to any png, however named. I assume that he made it non-default behaviour to reduce the rendering overhead, but since I don’t usually include that much heavy graphical content, I tend to do this just so as not to have to rename files.
        • Quote from: gilbertn at Feb 26, 2006, 04:51 AM

          Have you guys seen Dean Edwards’ "IE7 Compatibility Script"? It does a fantastic job of making IE6 behave like a vaguely standards-compliant browser - I gather that even Microsoft themselves were using it in the early stages of building IE7 - squashing a lot of the worst layout bugs and adding support for transparent pngs too (as long as one names the files according to his convention: "foo.png" should be called "foo-trans.png" as I recall).

          I include it by default in anything I do.

          Check it out at http://dean.edwards.name/IE7/

          Nice

          Would be great to have this as a plug-in
            follow me on twitter: @dimmy01
          • Quote from: Dimmy at Feb 26, 2006, 08:58 AM
            Would be great to have this as a plug-in

            Maybe as a default include?

            I’d suggest so simply because
            1) it obviates the need for the usual mountain of hacks for IE6
            2) It can be included on demand with conditional commments, so no redundant load / rendering

            The point is really about marketing the backwards / forwards compatibility of MODx: you guys have done such an amazing job of separating code from mark-up and style that porting css-driven layouts is a snap. If an out-of-the-box implementation takes care of the legacy nightmare, it’s easier still, and therefore that much more appealing to new adopters.

            This is a more pressing issue than ever before in the face of IE7. MS are frantically trying to stop people from using css hacks, since switching the stylesheet to a specialised one that will resolve IE6 bugs will make the page render peculiarly in IE7, as they seem to have gone to some trouble to do a better job of complying to standards (not that it comes anywhere close to passing Acid Test 2!).
            • The best and safest strategy for IE6 and below hacks is to include them in Condititional Comments. That way it’s much more certain to work in IE7 when it officially comes out.
                Ryan Thrash, MODX Co-Founder
                Follow me on Twitter at @rthrash or catch my occasional unofficial thoughts at thrash.me
              • Agreed.
                • Can someone help me use this plugin?

                  I installed it with the instructions in your post, but the pngs are still totally opaque in IE. Is there something I need to do to activate it?
                  • I installed the plugin and it seems to function fine in IE, But....
                    It makes the graphics HUGE.
                    You can see it at fisherpublishinghouse.com (use IE wink )
                    What can I do to bring it down to size?
                      PM me to find out how you can get a FREE ipad 2!
                    • you MUST set the height and width of the image for the plugin to work Ok

                      do not forget to set the plugin parameters and select the onwebpagePrerender selectionbox.
                      also refresh you website if you have cashing on.

                      I use this plugin all the time and it works great als make sure that you have the spacer.png in you assets/images folder

                      Greets Dimmy
                        follow me on twitter: @dimmy01